TRADING HOURS

Monday 19 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 20 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 21 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Thursday 22 Oct 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
Friday 23 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Saturday 24 Oct 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Sunday 25 Oct 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Individual store trading hours may vary.
Trading hours may vary on public holidays.
Please contact stores directly for their trading hours.

TRADING HOURS

Monday 19 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Tuesday 20 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Wednesday 21 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Thursday 22 Oct 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
Friday 23 Oct 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Saturday 24 Oct 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Sunday 25 Oct 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Individual store trading hours may vary.
Trading hours may vary on public holidays.
Please contact stores directly for their trading hours.

Home Activities

5 Science Experiments to Try at Home

To celebrate National Science Week which runs from the 15th – 23rd August, we’ve put together some fun and easy experiments for you and the kids to try at home!

Here are a few easy ways for the whole family to see science in action:

Tornado in a bottle

Reference screenshot only. GIF below (link) will be embedded into the article.

https://giphy.com/gifs/l46Csu3VAjoywj7WM?utm_source=iframe&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=Embeds&utm_term=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.businessinsider.com%2F8-awesomely-simple-science-experiments-you-can-do-at-home-2016-7%3Fr%3DUS&%3BIR=T

What you need:
  • 2 Bottles
  • A tube to connect the bottles
  • Some water
How it works:

You can create your own tornado in a bottle with only a few materials found around the house.

When you whirl the liquid in the top bottle, it creates a vortex as it drains into the bottom bottle. That’s because as the water flows down, air must flow up, creating a spiraling tornado.

Get creative by adding glitter or food dye to the bottle to make the tornado even more visually spectacular!

Source: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/8-awesomely-simple-science-experiments-you-can-do-at-home-2016-7?r=US&IR=T#/#tornado-in-a-bottle-1

Gooey Slime

Reference screenshot only. GIF below (link) will be embedded into the article.

https://giphy.com/gifs/d3MKoPyT4x6IxQVG?utm_source=iframe&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=Embeds&utm_term=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.businessinsider.com%2F8-awesomely-simple-science-experiments-you-can-do-at-home-2016-7%3Fr%3DUS&%3BIR=T

What you need:
  • Glue
  • Water
  • Food colouring
  • Borax
How it works:

When you mix glue, water, and a little bit of food colouring, then add some borax, a gooey slime forms. That’s because the glue contains a substance called polyvinyl acetate in it, which is a liquid polymer. Boras is a powdery white mineral that links the polyvinyl acetate molecules to each other, creating one large, flexible polymer = slime!

Source: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/8-awesomely-simple-science-experiments-you-can-do-at-home-2016-7?r=US&IR=T#/#tornado-in-a-bottle-1

Instant Ice

Reference screenshot only. GIF below (link) will be embedded into the article.

https://giphy.com/gifs/26BRAGrJU1TrUB62Q?utm_source=iframe&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=Embeds&utm_term=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.businessinsider.com%2F8-awesomely-simple-science-experiments-you-can-do-at-home-2016-7%3Fr%3DUS&%3BIR=T

What you need:
  • An unopened bottle of purified water
  • Some ice
How it works:

In order for water to become ice, it needs a nucleus for solid crystals to form. Usually, water is loaded with particles and impurities that enables ice to form. But purified water isn’t and because of this, can reach an even colder temperature before becoming solid.

For this experiment to work, place an unopened bottle of purified water into the freezer for a little less than three hours. This will allow enough time for the bottle to be chilled well below the temperature at which regular water freezes.

When you pour this super-cooled water onto a piece of ice, it provides the water with nuclei, causing it to freeze instantly. Ta-da!Instant ice!

Source: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/8-awesomely-simple-science-experiments-you-can-do-at-home-2016-7?r=US&IR=T#/#tornado-in-a-bottle-1

How to make a lava lamp

What you need:
  • A clean plastic bottle
  • Water
  • Vegetable Oil
  • Fizzing tablets (such as Alka Seltzer)
  • Food Colouring
Method:
  1. Fill 1 quarter of the bottle with water
  2. Pour the vegetable oil in the bottle until it is almost full. We recommend using a measuring cup with a spout or a funnel. You may have to wait a couple of minutes for the oil and water to separate.
  3. Add a few drops of your favorite food coloring. Watch as the color sinks through the oil. Did your drops of color mix with the water immediately or float in between for a few minutes?
  4. Break your fizzy tablet in half and drop part of it into the bottle. Get ready…here come the bubbly blobs!
  5. You can even get a flashlight, turn off the lights and drop in another half tablet. This time shine the flashlight through the lava lamp while the blobs are bubbling!
How it Works:

The oil floats on top of the water because it is less dense or lighter than water. The food colouring has the same density as the water so it sinks through the oil and mixes with the water. When you add the tablet it sinks to the bottom then starts to dissolve. As it dissolves it makes gas, carbon dioxide. Gas or air is lighter than water so it floats to the top. The air bubbles bring some colored water with them to the top. When the air comes out of the colored water blob, the water gets heavy again and sinks. It does this over and over again until the tablet is completely dissolved.

Source:https://www.sciencefun.org/kidszone/experiments/lava-lamp/

How to make a volcano

What you need:
  • 10ml dish soap
  • 100ml cold water
  • 400ml white vinegar
  • Food colouring
  • Baking soda slurry (fill a cup about ½ with baking soda, then fill the rest of the way with water)
  • An empty 2 litre bottle
Method:

NOTE: It’s recommended to conduct this experiment outside due to the mess.

  1. Combine the vinegar, water, dish soap and 2 drops of food colouring into the empty water bottle.
  2. Use a spoon to mix the baking soda slurry until it is all a liquid.
  3. Eruption time…pour the baking soda slurry into the bottle quickly and step back!
How it Works:

A chemical reaction between vinegar and baking soda creates a gas called carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is the same type of gas used to make the carbonation in sodas. What happens if you shake up a soda? The gas gets very excited and tries to spread out. There is not enough room in the bottle for the gas to spread out so it leaves through the opening very quickly, causing an eruption!

Source: https://www.sciencefun.org/kidszone/experiments/how-to-make-a-volcano/

Rainbow in a glass

What you need:
  • Water
  • A mug
  • 5 separate cups
  • A Tablespoon
  • A clear glass
  • A dropper or pipette
  • Skittles (lollies)
Method:
  1. Separate the Skittle in the following amounts: 2 red, 4 orange, 6 yellow, 8 green, and 10 purple.
  2. Heat a mug of water in the microwave for a minute and a half (or long enough that the water is hot, but not boiling). Be careful removing the water from the microwave–it’s hot!
  3. Measure and pour two tablespoons of hot water into each cup, on top of the Skittles.
  4. Stir each cup carefully so no water splashes out. The cups need to be cool for the next part of the experiment, so leave them somewhere where they won’t get knocked over. Stir them every ten minutes or so until the Skittles are dissolved and the water is room temperature.
  5. Using the dropper, add the coloured water from the five cups to the clear glass. Start with purple, then add green, then yellow, orange, and red last. Go slowly here, we don’t want the different layers to mix.
  6. Congratulations, you made a rainbow without even having to go outside!
How it Works:

Skittles are mostly made of sugar. When you add hot water to them, the sugar dissolves and the colouring on the shell of the Skittles turns the water different colours. The cup with only two red Skittles doesn’t have as much sugar as the cup with ten purple Skittles, but they both have the same amount of water. The amount of matter packed into a certain amount of space is called the density of the material. The red water is less dense than the purple water, so it will float on top of the purple water.

Source:https://www.sciencefun.org/kidszone/experiments/rainbow-in-a-glass/